TitleJoan in the middle of the garden. Suddenly

TitleJoan of Arc was just an ordinary child born in Domremy, a village in northeast France in 1412. She was one of five children born to an ordinary family. Her father was a farmer and her mother cared for children at their home. Joan did not attend school. She spent her time helping her mother and playing outside with her friends. Joan was aware of the French & English war, the Hundred Year War,  that had been taking place for eighty years, but her family did not really have anything to do with the war (Jenus).One summer day when Joan was thirteen, she was outside playing when she saw a strange bright light in the middle of the garden. Suddenly Saint Michael, an angel, appeared. Joan was terrified, but Saint Michael’s words were kind, and she was put at ease. Soon other saints appeared to Joan. Joan did not tell anyone about the saints because she was afraid no one would believe her even though people believed in fairies, curses, prophecies, witches, and magic during the Middle Ages( Kudlinski 54).1 For five years, the saints appeared to her three or four times a day. They even became her main friends. Overtime, their messages became more dark. They told her that there was dangerous work ahead that she would have to carry out. The saints told Joan that she needed to help the French defeat the English. Joan was shocked. She had no idea how a teenage girl was supposed to help defeat a country.2Joan faced many conflicts in the years following, and she had to make compromises to accomplish her goals.  Her conflicts were much different from the common conflicts teenagers face today!  First, Joan faced the conflict of figuring out how she was supposed to carry out the will of the saints. She was being asked to help her country defeat the English, but she was just a child. Not only was she a child, but she was a female. In the Middle Ages only men could go to battle. Women were expected to stay home. They were not allowed to become soldiers.   Joan decided to go visit Robert de Baudricourt, a French soldier and governor, for advice on how to fight in the army, but he basically thought Joan was crazy to think she could fight in war. He laughed in her face and told her to go home to her father. She left feeling defeated and had second thoughts on if she would really be able to fight in war. Then, her village of Domremy was attacked by Burgundian soldiers and burned down to the ground. Three months later, she learned that the great city of Orleans, the gateway to France, was surrounded by English soldiers.3 She knew it was time for her to stand up and fight for her country. She couldn’t give up! Yeatts, Tabatha. Joan of Arc Heavenly Warrior. New York: Tabatha Yeatts, 2009.Stanley, Diane. Joan of Arc. Scholastic Ink., Broadway, NY, 1998 Bull, Angela. Joan of Arc. Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc., New York, NY, 2000.She returned to Robert and begged him to help her. He finally agreed and said he would send a letter to king Charles the Dauphin. However Joan knew she needed to speak to him in person.Joan compromised by giving up many of the things she held dear to make the voyage to see King Charles. She knew the journey would be dangerous, so she gave up her girly clothes in exchange for men’s clothes and boots. She even cut off her long hair so she would look like a boy. Then, she gave up the comforts of her home and set out on a three hundred and fifty mile trip to Chinon in the bitter cold of February. She learned to do many things she had not ever done before, like horseback riding, traveling in the darkness of night, and crossing icy rain-swollen rivers.After eleven days of travel, she arrived in Chinon to meet with King Charles the Dauphin. When King Charles first met Joan he dressed as a courtier to try and fool Joan. However, Joan knew the king and bowed to him. He did not  care to hear much from Joan, but after their meeting, Joan was given permission to lead a handful of men to Orleans. Many experts have done their research, but no one understands why a young man in his 20s who was a royal  listened to and trusted a teenager who was hearing voices. Joan herself only said that the voices in her head told her to go boldly to Charles VII, and that he would receive a sign that would make him believe in her.The second conflict Joan faced was the battle in Orleans. Joan approached the city with her army. If the English captured it, there would not be anything left to stop them from going to the heart of France. However, the English had fourteen forts outside the city walls. Joan knew there was one way in, but as they approached she saw that the Loire River lay between her army and the city. The only way they could get there was by boat, but the wind was blowing in the wrong direction. Joan quickly became popular with the French because of the boost she gave to their morale. She arrived at the time when the French were so down because their troops lost fights even when they outnumbered the enemy. Joan showed the people that there was hope and that they shouldn’t stop fighting for their country and themselves. (Stanley, Diane)What happened? The next conflict Joan had to struggle with was convincing the Dauphin to go to Rheims to be crowned the king. Dauphin was very pleased with Joan and her victories, but he was cowardly and was not about to enter enemy territory in northern France. The voices of the saints continued to command Joan to have the Dauphin go to Rheims for his coronation. All the kings were crowned there because that is where the holy oil was kept. Despite all of her persuasive talk, Dauphin refused. In order to convince him, Joan compromised and went on a journey to prove to him she could get him to Rheims safely. She took on a series of battles against nearby towns that were under the rule of the English army. She defeated town after town. Left with no argument, the cowardly Dauphin agreed to travel to Rheims with Joan. Six months earlier, she was a girl playing at the farm, and now she was a knight standing beside a king at his coronation. Joan was excited and dedicated to the task she was called to do. Even though she had won over many towns for France, she knew she had not finished the battle. Her next conflict was to get permission from King Charles to recapture Paris. What happened?She faced death head on, and  she was a successful military leader.  Even though she didn’t actually fight in battle, she worked closely with her soldiers, developed military strategies, and gave directions to the troops. She was also wounded two times with an arrow, once in her shoulder and another in her thigh. (Yeatts,Tabatha)The successes of the French army did not last forever. Instead of pushing the English out of France, Joan and her army then suffered several military setbacks. On May 23, 1430, Joan was captured near Paris by the Duke of Burgundy’s men. King Charles, who was tired of hearing about what Joan wanted to do in the war, refused to pay to get Joan back to safety with the French. The Burgundian’s later turned her over to the English. Suddenly, people starting doubting whether or not Joan was really sent by God to help. They wondered why God allowed her to be captured so easily and why He was not helping her to freedom.  They believed that if the voices she heard were were not from God, then her whole cause, and the coronation of Charles VII, had been the work of the devil. (nat. geo)PRISONER of WAR The soldiers were in Compiegne and Joan thought she could go fight these soldiers but their were just so many Joan couldn’t handle them all. She was captured by the Burgundian but the Faces and King Charles refused to pay any money for her. Ladies that were with Joan offered Joan a dress to wear instead of the boy cloths but Joan refused to she said that God hasn’t given her permission to change cloths. She jump off a sixty-foot wall trying to escape. She was not hurt when she jumped but the soldiers were right there to pick her up and take her back to the sell. When she got back she started to hear forces again. Joan was at the Great Justice Hall at Rouen. She was very scared, she believed she had done nothing wrong.The people were asking Joan why she was dressed like a boy and she explained it was for her safety and that her voices told her to. The problem was that it was Joan’s voices that caused her the most trouble. Joan was told if she was guilty she would be burned to death. (Bull, Angela) Joan was tried and charged of 70 crimes, which included witchcraft, heresy, and even horse theft. However, these charges were reduced to 12 that mainly focused on the fact that she dressed like a man and claimed to be in contact with God. (All that is interesting staff)The bad people shaved off Joan’s hair and forced her to wear a dress. The soldiers tied her up onto a wood pole with rope. Joan of Arc was burned at the stake for dressing as and pretending to be a man, not witchcraft, as some sources say. It was believed that virgins like Joan were incapable of being witches. (All that is interesting)Joan compromised in many ways throughout her heroic journey.  She compromised her reputation as a lady when she chose to listen to the saints and become a soldier. She gave up looking like a lady. She cut her hair short and put on men’s clothing.  When Joan of Arc’s army was combined with Charles’s army, her Anglo-Burgundian enemies attacked her personally with words. They gossiped and spread the word that she was inspired by the devil. They also said that, Joan, who spent all of her time surrounded by male soldiers, was a tramp. That reputation stayed with her until she died. (national geographic) However, her biggest compromise was giving her life for the country she loved. Even though several people turned their backs on her, she was never disloyal and she never dishonored her county. The one compromise she never made was that of her faith in God. Even during the worst of times, Joan stopped to pray, listen for God’s guidance, and to praise Him for the blessings in her life.  Joan the girl who died will never be forgotten. After she was burned at the stake, the English cleared away the coals to display her charred body. That prevented anyone from claiming that she had somehow escaped. Then they burned the body twice more to completely destroy everything related to the body and keep anyone from taking any souvenirs. (All that is interesting staff)The English had hoped that once her ashes had been scattered in the Seine River her name would be erased from history, but after her death her name lived on in the hearts and minds of the French. The ordinary farm girl turned the tide for the French in the final years of the Hundred Years’ War. Although her enemies portrayed Joan as a witch and a madwoman, she was later pardoned and in 1920, Joan the Maid, was named as a saint by the Catholic Church. She became one of the most celebrated figures of late medieval history. Today, she is a national hero of the French. (nat. geographic)TitleJoan of Arc was just an ordinary child born in Domremy, a village in northeast France in 1412. She was one of five children born to an ordinary family. Her father was a farmer and her mother cared for children at their home. Joan did not attend school. She spent her time helping her mother and playing outside with her friends. Joan was aware of the French & English war, the Hundred Year War,  that had been taking place for eighty years, but her family did not really have anything to do with the war (Jenus).One summer day when Joan was thirteen, she was outside playing when she saw a strange bright light in the middle of the garden. Suddenly Saint Michael, an angel, appeared. Joan was terrified, but Saint Michael’s words were kind, and she was put at ease. Soon other saints appeared to Joan. Joan did not tell anyone about the saints because she was afraid no one would believe her even though people believed in fairies, curses, prophecies, witches, and magic during the Middle Ages( Kudlinski 54).1 For five years, the saints appeared to her three or four times a day. They even became her main friends. Overtime, their messages became more dark. They told her that there was dangerous work ahead that she would have to carry out. The saints told Joan that she needed to help the French defeat the English. Joan was shocked. She had no idea how a teenage girl was supposed to help defeat a country.2Joan faced many conflicts in the years following, and she had to make compromises to accomplish her goals.  Her conflicts were much different from the common conflicts teenagers face today!  First, Joan faced the conflict of figuring out how she was supposed to carry out the will of the saints. She was being asked to help her country defeat the English, but she was just a child. Not only was she a child, but she was a female. In the Middle Ages only men could go to battle. Women were expected to stay home. They were not allowed to become soldiers.   Joan decided to go visit Robert de Baudricourt, a French soldier and governor, for advice on how to fight in the army, but he basically thought Joan was crazy to think she could fight in war. He laughed in her face and told her to go home to her father. She left feeling defeated and had second thoughts on if she would really be able to fight in war. Then, her village of Domremy was attacked by Burgundian soldiers and burned down to the ground. Three months later, she learned that the great city of Orleans, the gateway to France, was surrounded by English soldiers.3 She knew it was time for her to stand up and fight for her country. She couldn’t give up! Yeatts, Tabatha. Joan of Arc Heavenly Warrior. New York: Tabatha Yeatts, 2009.Stanley, Diane. Joan of Arc. Scholastic Ink., Broadway, NY, 1998 Bull, Angela. Joan of Arc. Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc., New York, NY, 2000.She returned to Robert and begged him to help her. He finally agreed and said he would send a letter to king Charles the Dauphin. However Joan knew she needed to speak to him in person.Joan compromised by giving up many of the things she held dear to make the voyage to see King Charles. She knew the journey would be dangerous, so she gave up her girly clothes in exchange for men’s clothes and boots. She even cut off her long hair so she would look like a boy. Then, she gave up the comforts of her home and set out on a three hundred and fifty mile trip to Chinon in the bitter cold of February. She learned to do many things she had not ever done before, like horseback riding, traveling in the darkness of night, and crossing icy rain-swollen rivers.After eleven days of travel, she arrived in Chinon to meet with King Charles the Dauphin. When King Charles first met Joan he dressed as a courtier to try and fool Joan. However, Joan knew the king and bowed to him. He did not  care to hear much from Joan, but after their meeting, Joan was given permission to lead a handful of men to Orleans. Many experts have done their research, but no one understands why a young man in his 20s who was a royal  listened to and trusted a teenager who was hearing voices. Joan herself only said that the voices in her head told her to go boldly to Charles VII, and that he would receive a sign that would make him believe in her.The second conflict Joan faced was the battle in Orleans. Joan approached the city with her army. If the English captured it, there would not be anything left to stop them from going to the heart of France. However, the English had fourteen forts outside the city walls. Joan knew there was one way in, but as they approached she saw that the Loire River lay between her army and the city. The only way they could get there was by boat, but the wind was blowing in the wrong direction. Joan quickly became popular with the French because of the boost she gave to their morale. She arrived at the time when the French were so down because their troops lost fights even when they outnumbered the enemy. Joan showed the people that there was hope and that they shouldn’t stop fighting for their country and themselves. (Stanley, Diane)What happened? The next conflict Joan had to struggle with was convincing the Dauphin to go to Rheims to be crowned the king. Dauphin was very pleased with Joan and her victories, but he was cowardly and was not about to enter enemy territory in northern France. The voices of the saints continued to command Joan to have the Dauphin go to Rheims for his coronation. All the kings were crowned there because that is where the holy oil was kept. Despite all of her persuasive talk, Dauphin refused. In order to convince him, Joan compromised and went on a journey to prove to him she could get him to Rheims safely. She took on a series of battles against nearby towns that were under the rule of the English army. She defeated town after town. Left with no argument, the cowardly Dauphin agreed to travel to Rheims with Joan. Six months earlier, she was a girl playing at the farm, and now she was a knight standing beside a king at his coronation. Joan was excited and dedicated to the task she was called to do. Even though she had won over many towns for France, she knew she had not finished the battle. Her next conflict was to get permission from King Charles to recapture Paris. What happened?She faced death head on, and  she was a successful military leader.  Even though she didn’t actually fight in battle, she worked closely with her soldiers, developed military strategies, and gave directions to the troops. She was also wounded two times with an arrow, once in her shoulder and another in her thigh. (Yeatts,Tabatha)The successes of the French army did not last forever. Instead of pushing the English out of France, Joan and her army then suffered several military setbacks. On May 23, 1430, Joan was captured near Paris by the Duke of Burgundy’s men. King Charles, who was tired of hearing about what Joan wanted to do in the war, refused to pay to get Joan back to safety with the French. The Burgundian’s later turned her over to the English. Suddenly, people starting doubting whether or not Joan was really sent by God to help. They wondered why God allowed her to be captured so easily and why He was not helping her to freedom.  They believed that if the voices she heard were were not from God, then her whole cause, and the coronation of Charles VII, had been the work of the devil. (nat. geo)PRISONER of WAR The soldiers were in Compiegne and Joan thought she could go fight these soldiers but their were just so many Joan couldn’t handle them all. She was captured by the Burgundian but the Faces and King Charles refused to pay any money for her. Ladies that were with Joan offered Joan a dress to wear instead of the boy cloths but Joan refused to she said that God hasn’t given her permission to change cloths. She jump off a sixty-foot wall trying to escape. She was not hurt when she jumped but the soldiers were right there to pick her up and take her back to the sell. When she got back she started to hear forces again. Joan was at the Great Justice Hall at Rouen. She was very scared, she believed she had done nothing wrong.The people were asking Joan why she was dressed like a boy and she explained it was for her safety and that her voices told her to. The problem was that it was Joan’s voices that caused her the most trouble. Joan was told if she was guilty she would be burned to death. (Bull, Angela) Joan was tried and charged of 70 crimes, which included witchcraft, heresy, and even horse theft. However, these charges were reduced to 12 that mainly focused on the fact that she dressed like a man and claimed to be in contact with God. (All that is interesting staff)The bad people shaved off Joan’s hair and forced her to wear a dress. The soldiers tied her up onto a wood pole with rope. Joan of Arc was burned at the stake for dressing as and pretending to be a man, not witchcraft, as some sources say. It was believed that virgins like Joan were incapable of being witches. (All that is interesting)Joan compromised in many ways throughout her heroic journey.  She compromised her reputation as a lady when she chose to listen to the saints and become a soldier. She gave up looking like a lady. She cut her hair short and put on men’s clothing.  When Joan of Arc’s army was combined with Charles’s army, her Anglo-Burgundian enemies attacked her personally with words. They gossiped and spread the word that she was inspired by the devil. They also said that, Joan, who spent all of her time surrounded by male soldiers, was a tramp. That reputation stayed with her until she died. (national geographic) However, her biggest compromise was giving her life for the country she loved. Even though several people turned their backs on her, she was never disloyal and she never dishonored her county. The one compromise she never made was that of her faith in God. Even during the worst of times, Joan stopped to pray, listen for God’s guidance, and to praise Him for the blessings in her life.  Joan the girl who died will never be forgotten. After she was burned at the stake, the English cleared away the coals to display her charred body. That prevented anyone from claiming that she had somehow escaped. Then they burned the body twice more to completely destroy everything related to the body and keep anyone from taking any souvenirs. (All that is interesting staff)The English had hoped that once her ashes had been scattered in the Seine River her name would be erased from history, but after her death her name lived on in the hearts and minds of the French. The ordinary farm girl turned the tide for the French in the final years of the Hundred Years’ War. Although her enemies portrayed Joan as a witch and a madwoman, she was later pardoned and in 1920, Joan the Maid, was named as a saint by the Catholic Church. She became one of the most celebrated figures of late medieval history. Today, she is a national hero of the French. (nat. geographic)