Secondly, they are still a bit part of

Secondly, let’s discuss the ways he changed the lives of workers, for the better of it, with the mandation of many things. During the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919, young Tommy Douglas had seen something that would change his life forever. When the strike had reached its peak, teenager Douglas had witnessed the murder of a striker and an injury to another striker, by the RCMP, while he was delivering newspapers. Later in his life, he and his party passed laws that guaranteed the right to be in a union, and to bargain collectively as part of a union, as part of the Trade Unions Act. He also made the 44-hour week mandatory, which meant if employees worked for more, employers would be forced to pay overtime. The two weeks paid vacation that many people enjoy today was also made mandatory by Tommy Douglas’ government. The minimum wage in that time period also increased greatly, and he implemented the Workers Compensation Board, which “improved benefits and removed the waiting period for those who qualified”(tommydouglas.ca). Overall, he greatly improved the lives of workers and labourers. Thirdly, let’s discuss the ways he changed the lives of regular citizens in Saskatchewan during his time as Premier, through his creation of crown corporations for cheaper electricity. He made great advancements in this field. The Douglas administration in Saskatchewan created the Saskatchewan Power Corporation, in 1949, which was run as a Crown Corporation by the provincial government. Crown corporations are corporations that are owned by the government, but they are still a bit part of the private sector. By creating a crown corporation for electricity, this meant that residents would get cheaper electricity, as this corporation would compete against existing private companies and they would provide competition, which would eventually lower the price of the electricity. By creating competition and competing against the interests of private corporations, it would lead to a drop in price. And this project did reach its goal, as prices of electricity lowered during the time. Another great addition by the Douglas government was the Rural Electrification Act, which was created to provide electrical power for farmers and others in rural communities(tommydouglas.ca). And it too was a massive success as the investments in this plan skyrocketed from $40 million in 1952-1953 to $101 million in 1955(tommydouglas.ca). These huge investments helped provide many/many rural communities with power, and it was achieved under Tommy Douglas’ idea and government.