Released names, and catchy dances. However, what really

Released
in 1951, Singin in the Rain was one of the last films largely popular films to
be produced during the Golden Age of Hollywood. This iconic movie took on the
use of quintessential musical characteristics of that time, melodious music,
with big names, and catchy dances. However, what really set Singin in the Rain
apart from other musicals was its deeper level of parody that highlighted the
difficult transition from silent movies to “talkies” in addition to the movies
clever themes. Lastly, Singin’ in the Rain’s accurately depicts the burdensome,
uphill battle that was the beginnings of modern film making. All of these
factors are just some of the reasons that Singin’ in the Rain was, and still is
significant and popular today.

            Singin’ in the Rain starts with the
1927 premiere of The Royal Rascal starring Don Lockwood and his longtime
production partner, Lina Lamont, who together are two of the biggest names in
Hollywood at the time. The crowd begs for Don and Lina’s story. Reluctantly, Don
tells the crowd all about illustrious start while flashbacks reveal that he
actually came up singing and dancing with his best friend, Cosmo Brown. On the
way to the film’s after-party Don and Cosmo get stuck and bombarded by fans who
proceed to shred his clothes as “souvenirs”. Don escapes by jumping into Kathy
Selden’s car who is not excited about it to say the least. They end up falling
deeply in love with one another which causes problems on the current set for The
Dueling Cavalier, a talkie with Lina despite her hideous voice. Horrible
perceptions of the current version of The Dueling Cavalier result in a major
change, turning it into a musical called The Dancing Cavalier with Kathy’s
voice being played over Lina’s. Lina finds out that Kathy’s going to get
on-screen credit as her voice causing her to sue. In the end Lina gets exposed
and Kathy gets the credit she deserves.

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            Innovation is most commonly defined
simply as a new idea or method to do something. However, innovation in itself
is truly just a better solution to adapt and meet the needs of the task or
problem at hand. Singin’ in the Rain’s film making process did not really
represent any form of innovation, it was simply just a well-executed
production. Where the innovation in this movie lied was in its writing and
parody. No other film had ever been able to show the process of making a successful
movie let alone a talkie, all while crafting one of the most engaging and entertaining
musicals of all time. Singin’ in the Rain set the standard for everything else
to follow.

            Personally, I loved this movie. I
have actually picked out several others from the same era to watch in my free
time including, The Grapes of Wrath and The Bridge on the River Kwai. When the
movie first started I wasn’t really into it. It was not until Don began the hit
on Lina in her car that I realized I was really starting to get into and
appreciate the film. I really did find this movie funny and entertaining and
can’t wait to watch more like it. It really did spark a newfound interest in
old movies I previously have not had.

            In sum, Singin’ in the Rain proved
to not only be as entertaining as Rotten Tomatoes said it would be, but a film
icon that everyone should take the time to watch and truly appreciate. The
music selection, acting, dancing, and story line itself were all something to
marvel at and I am extremely glad I chose to watch this film.