Finding that peaked my interest but soon discovered

Finding an academic journal article isn’t always an easy task, people have to know how to navigate a research database along with the correct key terms to look up for their specific subject. To find my article I used Social Sciences Full Text on the Macodrum Library website. Since the topic I chose is one of the most talked about world issues, it was quite easy to find the perfect article without having to use any filters. I simply typed in “access to water” for my keywords and hundreds of articles popped up onto my screen within seconds. The hard part was having to find one that interested me. I thought I was successful immediately when I found an article that peaked my interest but soon discovered I wasn’t so lucky. The Macodrum Library database only had the article abstract, not the full text. I had to switch over to the NCBI database and try again. This time I was lucky, they had the full text and also the full article in its original form on a PDF, but since I already knew what my article was about, I used different keywords. Instead of using “access to water” I simply typed: “water India” and found my article quite easily. My article was published in the Elsevier journal under the Social Science & Medicine category. I know my journal is an article because it was stated as an article under the document type, and also reading through it I could tell the authors gathered information from numerous sources to create an article that will give people more knowledge about how water and sanitation greatly impact the children in India. They doesn’t start off trying to sell a point or give  a review of a book, instead they used hard facts to draw the reader in to learn more about the issue they want to discuss.Part 2: Article SummaryThe article I chose, Reduced burden of childhood diarrheal diseases through increased access to water and sanitation in India: A modeling analysis, was written by five different authors, Arindam Nandi, Hamar Megiddo, Ashvin Ashok, Amit Verna, and Ramanan Laxminarayan. In this article the authors strive to get the reader to understand the great harm unsafe drinking water and poor sanitation can do to children in India and how if we change the living conditions there and give access to clean water and proper sanitation, children will become less likely to receive a diarrheal disease that can cause death. Some of the main points in this article include how childhood diarrheal diseases in India have major costs when it comes to the economy and health issues. Diarrhea can cause over 300,000 deaths per year which results in the loss of $13 billion per year. India accounts for 20% of the global burden of death of kids under the age of five, which is the largest contributing factor. Around 1.2 million children die in India who are under the age of five. 1.2 million kids lost their lives before they really begun living. Furthermore, the authors talk about how piped water and improved sanitation can counter the first point and bring positive benefits to the country. In the introduction they stated many facts, some of which included how access to piped water can reduce the risk of diarrhea by 17.4% and how access to sanitation makes children 16.9% less likely to get the deadly diarrhea than children who don’t have access to proper sanitation. Making India a place where there is access to clean water and proper sanitation everywhere can improve the living conditions and save the lives of thousands of children each year. Finally, they discuss how in the poorer parts of India, they are more likely to get help first when it comes to clean water and proper sanitation. Many people in the world want to lend a helping hand, and do so in a lot of poor areas in the world, which we saw in class in the Volunteers Unleashed film. Poor parts of India get the help they need which saves lives but we, as people, need to work together until everyone in India, and all the other third world countries, have access to clean drinking water and proper sanitation to avoid diseases such as the diarrhea seen in India that has taken over a million lives.