AbstractThe use of interaction analysis. The goal is

AbstractThe differences in the effects of graffiti arts in the eyes of the public and artists have been a topic of interest in the world for many years. These differences and how they perceive the art of graffiti may lead to miscommunications, conflicts and even dissatisfaction with society. This study analyzes the effects of graffiti arts and cultural influences amongst artists, more specifically curators. It questions how differences in the effects of graffiti art may or may not contribute or affect public, artists, curators influences. The study will be conducted through the use of interaction analysis. The goal is to increase the amount of knowledge regarding the effectiveness of graffiti art and how it influences artists to use the form of art in typography to produce enticing visuals and understanding the value form of skill in forming graffiti art might be integrated into a circular design.The literature review will discuss about the importance of the graffiti art form to the individual expression of the artist’s thoughts and visual representation on how they communicate with as murals. The study will further advance the research by helping people discover more about graffiti art, how to decipher the artist visual techniques and why typeface and color palette moods used to attain such visual prowess.Literature ReviewStreet Art and GraffitiOver the last two decades, both graffiti and street art culture have become increasingly entangled in debates about cultural heritage, both in terms of the practical dimensions of cleaning regimes and preservation strategies and more philosophical questions about cultural value, memory and the role of cultural institutions and archives. Most graffiti art tags involve the use of typography in which graphic designers should understand something about the language and symbolism of this design resource if they are to use it wisely in their designs. Due to its short lifespan in the urban environment, designers must begin to record, understand, and study this evolving symbol system and art form.As such, graffiti is eligible for media analysis. In addition to being a creative personal outlet, graffiti has proven to be a popular form of public address for socio-political issues: despite the disagreement on graffiti as art or vandalism, the creative effort in it marks graffiti as an “an intellectual answer to resistance emotions” and its alternative nature places its original messages outside the mainstream politics and media (Nicholls, 2012,). ¬†Graffiti art is nowadays one of the most distinct of tourists visual features of urban spaces. The graffiti art phenomenon started first evolving in Philadelphia also supported graffiti art projects by writers Cornbread and Cool Earl in the late 1960s. Hereafter, it fully developed graffiti art in New York City in the 1970s. The word “graffiti” comes from the Italian word “graffiato”, which means “scratched.” Art historians believe the term arose from the fact that the earliest forms of graffiti were carved on walls with sharp objects by cavemen. Graffiti has been around a long, long time. Social Surroundings and Impact on PracticeToday, it is very common to find graffiti art in almost any corner of the street, art installations or curated galleries. Graffiti art has become a common part of life.The effects of graffiti art may likely be connected to typography, a style and appearance of printed matter used largely by graphic designers and illustrated artists. Graffiti is not a novelty; on the contrary, painting on walls has a long history starting with the cavemen markings, evolving into spray-can calligraphy and illustrations and eventually into a growing number of forms all around the world including onto canvases now hanging in art museums. First and foremost, graffiti serves as a venue for the individual expression of artists’ thoughts and ideas, and it communicates their identities from surfaces to the society (Jorgenson & Lange, 1975; Bowen, 2010). In many ways graffiti often has a reputation as part of a subculture that rebels against authority. An example includes the anarchy symbol that was adopted by the anarcho-punk band “Crass,” who made a campaign of stenciling anti-war, anarchist, feminist and anti-consumerist messages around 29 the London Underground system during the late 1970s and early 1980s (Southern Records). Fans of this band, anarchy has a unique meaning, and they use the symbol “A” with a circle to label this form of anarchy for others. They are telling the listeners, that they don’t believe in war and they support feminist and anti-consumerist messages in their kinds of music.” Dale later explains that he also thinks the street designations relate somewhat to the anarchy symbol A (Dale). Graffiti art can relate to a wide range of attitudes and purposes, such as political commentary, protection or beautification. While graffiti is an art form that appears and disappears rapidly, there is still a need to know about the cultural properties of this art form. Graffiti writers or ‘writers’ as they usually call themselves, do not get much chance to straighten out this ‘misunderstanding’ or talk people through the reasoning behind their activities. As ‘kids’ and ‘folk devils’ (Cohen, 1987), they tend to get spoken for, spoken over or silenced altogether. Street art and graffiti can be motivated by its surrounding elements that the art form aims to express such as social injustice. “A practice that, instead of delighting merely refined sensibilities of an elite few, has the power to engage, effortlessly and aesthetically, the masses through its manifest creativity, skill, originality, depth of meaning, and beauty” (Alden, 2010). Miller also adapted that because everything interconnects with something else, it has a harmonious composition and that whole thing has a story. (Miller, 2002)ConclusionOverall, the current literature suggests that graffiti art made its impact in many forms of art in the modern day practice. Graffiti art is constantly changing. It is an art form that feeds on different ideas, surroundings and is sensitive to changes in every art forms. Many of these graffiti artists focus on the visual language of signs, icon, logos, and characters in their arts. However, it does not conclusively show that one needs to understand street art in order to appreciate graffiti. Street art and graffiti are gaining importance in the art world and that street art and graffiti are becoming great artistic expressions that connect places and the people’s messages. AbstractThe differences in the effects of graffiti arts in the eyes of the public and artists have been a topic of interest in the world for many years. These differences and how they perceive the art of graffiti may lead to miscommunications, conflicts and even dissatisfaction with society. This study analyzes the effects of graffiti arts and cultural influences amongst artists, more specifically curators. It questions how differences in the effects of graffiti art may or may not contribute or affect public, artists, curators influences. The study will be conducted through the use of interaction analysis. The goal is to increase the amount of knowledge regarding the effectiveness of graffiti art and how it influences artists to use the form of art in typography to produce enticing visuals and understanding the value form of skill in forming graffiti art might be integrated into a circular design.The literature review will discuss about the importance of the graffiti art form to the individual expression of the artist’s thoughts and visual representation on how they communicate with as murals. The study will further advance the research by helping people discover more about graffiti art, how to decipher the artist visual techniques and why typeface and color palette moods used to attain such visual prowess.Literature ReviewStreet Art and GraffitiOver the last two decades, both graffiti and street art culture have become increasingly entangled in debates about cultural heritage, both in terms of the practical dimensions of cleaning regimes and preservation strategies and more philosophical questions about cultural value, memory and the role of cultural institutions and archives. Most graffiti art tags involve the use of typography in which graphic designers should understand something about the language and symbolism of this design resource if they are to use it wisely in their designs. Due to its short lifespan in the urban environment, designers must begin to record, understand, and study this evolving symbol system and art form.As such, graffiti is eligible for media analysis. In addition to being a creative personal outlet, graffiti has proven to be a popular form of public address for socio-political issues: despite the disagreement on graffiti as art or vandalism, the creative effort in it marks graffiti as an “an intellectual answer to resistance emotions” and its alternative nature places its original messages outside the mainstream politics and media (Nicholls, 2012,). ¬†Graffiti art is nowadays one of the most distinct of tourists visual features of urban spaces. The graffiti art phenomenon started first evolving in Philadelphia also supported graffiti art projects by writers Cornbread and Cool Earl in the late 1960s. Hereafter, it fully developed graffiti art in New York City in the 1970s. The word “graffiti” comes from the Italian word “graffiato”, which means “scratched.” Art historians believe the term arose from the fact that the earliest forms of graffiti were carved on walls with sharp objects by cavemen. Graffiti has been around a long, long time. Social Surroundings and Impact on PracticeToday, it is very common to find graffiti art in almost any corner of the street, art installations or curated galleries. Graffiti art has become a common part of life.The effects of graffiti art may likely be connected to typography, a style and appearance of printed matter used largely by graphic designers and illustrated artists. Graffiti is not a novelty; on the contrary, painting on walls has a long history starting with the cavemen markings, evolving into spray-can calligraphy and illustrations and eventually into a growing number of forms all around the world including onto canvases now hanging in art museums. First and foremost, graffiti serves as a venue for the individual expression of artists’ thoughts and ideas, and it communicates their identities from surfaces to the society (Jorgenson & Lange, 1975; Bowen, 2010). In many ways graffiti often has a reputation as part of a subculture that rebels against authority. An example includes the anarchy symbol that was adopted by the anarcho-punk band “Crass,” who made a campaign of stenciling anti-war, anarchist, feminist and anti-consumerist messages around 29 the London Underground system during the late 1970s and early 1980s (Southern Records). Fans of this band, anarchy has a unique meaning, and they use the symbol “A” with a circle to label this form of anarchy for others. They are telling the listeners, that they don’t believe in war and they support feminist and anti-consumerist messages in their kinds of music.” Dale later explains that he also thinks the street designations relate somewhat to the anarchy symbol A (Dale). Graffiti art can relate to a wide range of attitudes and purposes, such as political commentary, protection or beautification. While graffiti is an art form that appears and disappears rapidly, there is still a need to know about the cultural properties of this art form. Graffiti writers or ‘writers’ as they usually call themselves, do not get much chance to straighten out this ‘misunderstanding’ or talk people through the reasoning behind their activities. As ‘kids’ and ‘folk devils’ (Cohen, 1987), they tend to get spoken for, spoken over or silenced altogether. Street art and graffiti can be motivated by its surrounding elements that the art form aims to express such as social injustice. “A practice that, instead of delighting merely refined sensibilities of an elite few, has the power to engage, effortlessly and aesthetically, the masses through its manifest creativity, skill, originality, depth of meaning, and beauty” (Alden, 2010). Miller also adapted that because everything interconnects with something else, it has a harmonious composition and that whole thing has a story. (Miller, 2002)ConclusionOverall, the current literature suggests that graffiti art made its impact in many forms of art in the modern day practice. Graffiti art is constantly changing. It is an art form that feeds on different ideas, surroundings and is sensitive to changes in every art forms. Many of these graffiti artists focus on the visual language of signs, icon, logos, and characters in their arts. However, it does not conclusively show that one needs to understand street art in order to appreciate graffiti. Street art and graffiti are gaining importance in the art world and that street art and graffiti are becoming great artistic expressions that connect places and the people’s messages.